Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-579
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-579
 
06 Sep 2022
06 Sep 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Quantifying daily NOx and CO2 emissions from Wuhan using satellite observations from TROPOMI and OCO-2

Qianqian Zhang1,2, K. Folkert Boersma1,3, Bin Zhao4, Henk Eskes3, Cuihong Chen5, Haotian Zheng4, and Xingying Zhang2 Qianqian Zhang et al.
  • 1Wageningen University, Environmental Science Group, Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • 2Key Laboratory of Radiometric Calibration and Validation for Environmental Satellites, Innovation Center for Fengyun Meteorological Satellite (FYSIC), National Satellite Meteorological Center, China Meteorology Administration, Beijing, 100081, China
  • 3Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt, the Netherlands
  • 4State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
  • 5Satellite Application Center for Ecology and Environment, Ministry of Ecology and Environment of the People's Republic of China, Beijing, 100094, China

Abstract. Quantification and control of NOx and CO2 emissions are important across the world to limit adverse climate change. We present a new top-down method, an improved superposition column model to estimate day-to-day NOx and CO2 emissions from the large city of Wuhan, China, located in a polluted background. The lasted released version 2.3.1 TROPOMI NO2 columns and the version 10r of the OCO-2 observed CO2 mixing ratio are employed. Our estimated NOx and CO2 emissions from Wuhan are verified against bottom-up inventories with small deviations (< 3 %). Based on the estimated CO2 emissions, we also predicted daily CO2 column mixing ratio enhancements, which match well with OCO-2 observations (< 5 % bias, within ±0.3 ppm). We capture the day-to-day variation of NOx and CO2 emissions from Wuhan in 2019–2020, which does not reveal a substantial ‘weekend reduction’ but does show a clear ‘holiday reduction’ in the NOx and CO2 emissions. Our method also quantifies the abrupt decrease and slow rebound of NOx and CO2 emissions due to the Wuhan lockdown in early 2020. This work demonstrates the improved superposition model to be a promising new tool for the quantification of city NOx and CO2 emissions, allowing policy makers to gain real-time information into spatial-temporal emission patterns and the effectiveness of carbon and nitrogen regulation in urban environments.

Qianqian Zhang et al.

Status: open (until 18 Oct 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-579', Anonymous Referee #1, 20 Sep 2022 reply

Qianqian Zhang et al.

Qianqian Zhang et al.

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Latest update: 28 Sep 2022
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Short summary
We developed an improved superposition column model and used the latest released (v2.3.1) TROPOMI satellite NO2 observations to estimate daily city-scale NOx and CO2 emissions. The results are verified against bottom-up emissions and OCO-2 XCO2 observations. We got the day-to-day variation of city NOx and CO2 emissions, allowing policy makers to gain real-time information into spatial-temporal emission patterns and the effectiveness of carbon and nitrogen regulation in urban environments.
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