Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-320
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-320
 
11 May 2022
11 May 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Impact of cooking style and oil on semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compound emissions from Chinese domestic cooking

Kai Song1,2, Song Guo1,2, Yuanzheng Gong1, Daqi Lv1, Yuan Zhang1, Zichao Wan1, Tianyu Li1, Wenfei Zhu1, Hui Wang1, Ying Yu1, Rui Tan1, Ruizhe Shen1, Sihua Lu1, Shuangde Li3, Yunfa Chen3, and Min Hu1,2 Kai Song et al.
  • 1State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, International Joint Laboratory for Regional Pollution Control, Ministry of Education (IJRC), College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Beijing 100871, China
  • 2Collaborative Innovation Center of Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
  • 3State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China

Abstract. To elucidate the molecular chemical compositions, volatility-polarity distributions, as well as influencing factors of Chinese cooking emissions, a comprehensive cooking emission experiment was conducted. Semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) from cooking fumes were analyzed by a thermal desorption comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometer (TD-GC×GC-qMS). Emissions from four typical Chinese dishes, i.e., fried chicken, Kung Pao chicken, pan-fried tofu, and stir-fried cabbage were investigated to illustrate the impact of cooking style and material. Fumes of chicken fried with corn, peanut, soybean, and sunflower oils were investigated to demonstrate the influence of cooking oil. A total of 201 chemicals were quantified. Dishes cooked by stir-frying or deep-frying cooking styles emit much more pollutants than relatively mild cooking methods. Aromatics and oxygenated compounds were extensively detected among meat-related cooking fumes, while a vegetable-related profile was observed in the emissions of stir-fried cabbage. The volatility-polarity distributions of the four dish emissions were quite similar, yet the distributions diverged when different types of oils were utilized. Ozone formation potential (OFP) was dominated by chemicals in the VOC range. 10.2 % - 32.0 % of the SOA estimation could be explained by S/IVOCs. Pixel-based partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and multiway principal component analysis (MPCA) were utilized for sample classification and key components identification. The results indicated that the oil factor explained more variance of chemical compositions than the cooking style factor. MPCA results emphasize the importance of the unsaturated fatty acid-alkadienal-volatile products mechanism (oil autooxidation) accelerated by the cooking and heating procedure.

Kai Song et al.

Status: open (until 22 Jun 2022)

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Kai Song et al.

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Short summary
Emissions from 4 typical Chinese dishes and fried chicken cooked with 4 oils were investigated to illustrate the impact of cooking style and material. 10.2 % - 32.0 % of the estimated SOA could be explained by S/IVOCs oxidation. Multiway principal component analysis (MPCA) emphasizes the importance of the unsaturated fatty acid-alkadienal-volatile products mechanism (oil autooxidation) accelerated by the cooking and heating procedure.
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