Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-280
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-280
 
03 May 2022
03 May 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Collective geographical eco-regions and precursor sources driving Arctic new particle formation

James Brean1, David C. S. Beddows1, Roy M. Harrison1,7, Congbo Song1, Peter Tunved2, Johan Ström2, Radovan Krejci2, Eyal Freud2, Andreas Massling3, Henrik Skov3, Eija Asmi4, Angelo Lupi5, and Manuel Dall’Osto6 James Brean et al.
  • 1Division of Environmental Health & Risk Management School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
  • 2Department of Environmental Science & Bolin Centre of Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm 10691, Sweden
  • 3Interdisciplinary Centre for Climate Change (iClimate), Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Roskilde 4000, Denmark
  • 4Atmospheric Composition Research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland
  • 5Institute of Polar Science, CNR, Bologna, Italy
  • 6Institute of Marine Science, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona, Spain
  • 7Department of Environmental Sciences / Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah, 21589, Saudi Arabia

Abstract. The Arctic is a rapidly changing ecosystem, with complex ice-ocean-atmosphere feedbacks. An important process is new particle formation (NPF) from gas phase precursors, which provide a climate forcing effect. NPF has been studied comprehensively at different sites in the Arctic ranging from those in the high Arctic, those at Svalbard, and those in the continental Arctic, but no harmonized analysis has been performed on all sites simultaneously, with no calculations of key NPF parameters available for some sites. Here, we analyse the formation and growth of new particles from six long-term ground-based stations in the Arctic (Alert, Villum, Tiksi, Mt. Zeppelin, Gruvebadet. & Utqiagvik). Our analysis of particle formation and growth rates, as well as back trajectory analysis shows summertime maxima in frequency of NPF and particle formation rate at all sites, although the mean frequency and particle formation rates themselves vary greatly between sites, highest at Svalbard, and lowest in the high Arctic. Growth rate, condensational sinks and vapour source rates show a slight bias towards the southernmost sites, with vapour source rates varying by around an order of magnitude between the northernmost and southernmost sites. Air masse back trajectories during NPF at these northernmost sites are associated with large areas of sea ice and snow, whereas events at Svalbard are associated with more sea ice and ocean regions. Events at the southernmost sites are associated with large areas of land, and sea ice. These results emphasize how understanding the geographical variation in surface type across the Arctic is key to understanding secondary aerosol sources, and provide a harmonised analysis of NPF across the Arctic.

James Brean et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-280', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Jun 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Manuel Dall'Osto, 19 Aug 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2022-280', Anonymous Referee #2, 20 Jun 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Manuel Dall'Osto, 19 Aug 2022

James Brean et al.

James Brean et al.

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Our results emphasize how understanding the geographical variation in surface type across the Arctic is key to understanding secondary aerosol sources, and provide a harmonised analysis of NPF across the Arctic.
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