Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-269
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-269
 
02 May 2022
02 May 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Measurement Report: concentrations and composition profiles of sugars and amino acids in atmospheric fine particulates: identify local primary sources characteristics

Ren-Guo Zhu1,3, Hua-Yun Xiao2, Liqin Cheng1,3, Huixiao Zhu1,3, Hongwei Xiao1, and Yunyun Gong1 Ren-Guo Zhu et al.
  • 1Jiangxi Province Key Laboratory of the Causes and Control of Atmospheric Pollution, East China University of Technology, Nanchang 330013, China
  • 2School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
  • 3School of School of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Technology, Nanchang 330013, China

Abstract. Sugars and amino acids are major classes of organic components in atmospheric fine particles and play important roles in atmospheric processes. However, the identification of their sources in different regions is less explored. To characterize local primary sources (biomass burning, plant and soil sources) and evaluate their contributions to the total sugar compounds and AAs pool in different regions, fine particulate matter samples were collected from the urban, rural and forest locations. The concentrations and compositions of sugar compounds (anhydrosugars, primary sugars and sugar alcohols), free amino acids (FAAs) and combined amino acids (CAAs) were analyzed. Overall, the distribution pattern of sugar compounds and CAAs in PM2.5 was generally similar among the urban, rural and forest locations. Moreover, the average contribution of sugar compounds and CAAs reflecting BB, plant and soil sources to the total sugar and CAA pool were consistent in all sampling locations. These suggest BB, plant and soil sources all have important contributions to aerosol sugars and CAAs in three locations. In the urban area, the concentrations of anhydrosugars showed a positive correlation with combined Gly concentrations, but no correlation was found between these two compounds in the rural and forest areas, indicating that the urban area is mainly affected by local combustion sources, while the rural and forest areas may be more influenced by long-transport BB source. In addition, the average L/M ratio in the urban location (59.9) was much higher than those in the rural (6.9) and forest locations (7.2), implying BB aerosols collected in the urban location originated from lignite burning while the type of biofuels used in the rural and forest locations is mainly softwood. The concentrations of sugar alcohols in the rural and forest locations were positively correlated with that of CAAs, which are abundant in the topsoil, suggesting that the contribution of local topsoil sources is large in these two locations. In the rural area, the concentrations of primary sugars were positively correlated with that of combined aspartic acid (a CAA specie abundant in grass, the dominant vegetation in the rural area), while in the forest area, primary sugars had good correlations with combined citrulline, lysine, ornithine, glutamic acid and serine (CAA species abundant in pine, dominant vegetation in the forest area), indicating that combining primary sugars with major CAA species in local dominant vegetations may identify local vegetation types. Furthermore, the nitrogen isotope of combined Gly and PMF model results demonstrated that the average contribution of combustion processes to total sugar compounds and CAAs pool in the urban and rural locations was higher than that in the forest location while primary biogenic sources showed a higher average contribution in the forest location than those in rural and urban locations. Our findings suggest that combining specific sugar tracers and chemical profiles CAAs in local emission sources can provide insight to primary sources characteristics including the types of biofuels burned, the contribution of topsoil sources and local vegetation types.

Ren-Guo Zhu et al.

Status: open (until 18 Jun 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Ren-Guo Zhu et al.

Data sets

Nanchang Statistical Yearbook Nanchang Statistics Bureau http://tjj.nc.gov.cn/zbft/front/tjjnjnew/2020/mobile/index.html

Concentration of saccharides in PM2.5 Zhu, R.-G. https://figshare.com/articles/dataset/Concentration_of_saccharides_in_PM2_5_xlsx/17158661

Ren-Guo Zhu et al.

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Short summary
Sugars and amino acids are major classes of organic components in atmospheric fine particles and play important roles in the atmosphere. To identify their sources in different regions, the concentrations and compositions of sugar amino acids in fine particles were analyzed. Our findings suggest that combining specific sugar tracers and chemical profiles of combined amino acids in local emission sources can identify various source characteristics of primary sources.
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