Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-966
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-966

  06 Jan 2022

06 Jan 2022

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

The Mount Everest plume in winter

Edward Hindman1 and Scott Lindstrom2 Edward Hindman and Scott Lindstrom
  • 1Department Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, The City College of New York, New York, 10031, US
  • 2Space Sciences and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706, US

Abstract. Mt. Everest’s summit pyramid is the highest obstacle on earth to the wintertime jet-stream winds. Downwind, in its wake, a visible plume often forms. The meteorology and composition of the plume are unknown. Accordingly, we observed real-time images from a geosynchronous meteorological satellite from November 2020 through March 2021 to identify plumes and collect the corresponding meteorological data. We used the data with a basic meteorological model to show the plumes formed when sufficiently moist air was drawn into the wake. We conclude the plumes were composed initially of either cloud droplets or ice particles depending on the temperature. One plume was observed to glaciate downwind. Thus, Everest plumes may be a source of snowfall formed insitu. The plumes, however, were not composed of resuspended snow.

Edward Hindman and Scott Lindstrom

Status: open (until 17 Feb 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-966', Edward Hindman, 08 Jan 2022 reply
  • AC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-966', Edward Hindman, 13 Jan 2022 reply
  • AC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-966', Edward Hindman, 19 Jan 2022 reply

Edward Hindman and Scott Lindstrom

Edward Hindman and Scott Lindstrom

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Short summary
The plumes frequently seen attached to and streaming downwind of the Mt. Everest summit are often referred to as snow plumes, plumes of resuspended snow. To test this statement, we studied the peak using satellite images and the corresponding meteorology. The plumes we studied formed when moist air rose in the wake of the summit and condensed to form clouds. The plumes were not composed of resuspended snow, they were banner clouds.
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