Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-755
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-755

  29 Oct 2021

29 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Impacts of ice-nucleating particles from marine aerosols on mixed-phase orographic clouds during 2015 ACAPEX field campaign

Yun Lin1,2, Jiwen Fan1, Pengfei Li3,4, L. Ruby Leung1, Paul DeMott5, Lexie Goldberger1, Jennifer Comstock1, Ying Liu1, Jonghoon Jeong1,2, and Jason Tomlinson1 Yun Lin et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
  • 2Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90064, USA
  • 3College of Science and Technology, Hebei Agricultural University, Baoding, Hebei 14 071000, P.R. China
  • 4Research Center for Air Pollution and Health; Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecological Health, Ministry of Education, College of Environment and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, P.R. China
  • 5Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA

Abstract. A large fraction of annual precipitation over the western United States comes from wintertime orographic clouds associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs). The transported African and Asian dust and marine aerosols from the Pacific Ocean may act as ice-nucleating particles (INPs) to affect cloud and precipitation properties over the region. Here we explored the effects of INPs from marine aerosols on orographic mixed-phase clouds and precipitation at different AR stages for an AR event observed during the 2015 ACAPEX field campaign under low dust (< 0.02 cm-3) conditions. Simulations were conducted using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with the spectral-bin microphysics at 1-km grid spacing, with ice nucleation connected with dust and marine aerosols. By comparing against airborne and ground-based observations, accounting for marine INP effects improves the simulation of cloud phase state and precipitation. The marine INPs enhance the formation of ice and snow, leading to less shallow warm clouds but more mixed-phase and deep clouds, and increased ice water path (over 5 times) and snow precipitation (over 40 times). The responses of cloud and precipitation to marine INPs vary with the AR stages with more significant effects before AR landfall and post-AR than after AR landfall, mainly because the moisture and temperature conditions change with the AR evolution. This work suggests weather and climate models need to consider the impacts of marine INPs since their contribution is notable under low dust conditions despite the much lower relative ice nucleation efficiency of marine INPs.

Yun Lin et al.

Status: open (until 10 Dec 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-755', Anonymous Referee #2, 18 Nov 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-755', Anonymous Referee #1, 19 Nov 2021 reply

Yun Lin et al.

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Short summary
How sea spray aerosols may affect cloud and precipitation over the region by acting as ice-nucleating particles (INPs) is unknown. We explored the effects of INPs from marine aerosols on orographic cloud and precipitation for an AR event observed during the 2015 ACAPEX field campaign. The marine INPs enhance the formation of ice and snow, leading to less shallow warm clouds but more mixed-phase and deep clouds. This work suggests models need to consider the impacts of marine INPs.
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