Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-74
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-74

  04 Feb 2021

04 Feb 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ACP.

Fluorescent biological aerosol particles over the central Pacific Ocean: covariation with ocean-surface biological activity indicators

Kaori Kawana, Kazuhiko Matsumoto, Fumikazu Taketani, Takuma Miyakawa, and Yugo Kanaya Kaori Kawana et al.
  • Earth Surface System Research Center, Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokohama, 2360001, Japan

Abstract. Combining Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensors and DNA staining techniques, online and offline shipboard observations of fluorescent aerosol particles in the atmosphere were carried out over the central Pacific Ocean during March 2019 to identify bioaerosols and determine their spatio-temporal distribution. To understand the origins of and processes associated with bioaerosols, we conducted correlation analyses of fluorescent particle number concentration, wind speed, and a variety of chemical and biological indicators, including concentrations of chlorophyll a, bacteria, marine organic gel particles such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEPs) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSPs). Five-day backward trajectory analysis indicated that oceanic air masses were dominant between 6 and 18 March after which the influence of long-range transport from the continent of Asia was prominent. For the first period, we identified certain types of fluorescent particles as bioaerosols with marine origins, because their number concentrations were highly correlated with concentrations of TEPs and bacteria (R: 0.80–0.92) after considering the wind speed effect. For the second period, there was strong correlation between another type of fluorescent particles and CSPs irrespective of wind speed, implying that the fluorescent particles advected from land were mixed with those of marine origins. From the results of our correlation analysis, we developed equations to derive atmospheric bioaerosol number density in the marine atmosphere over the central Pacific Ocean from a combination of biogenic proxy quantities (chlorophyll a, TEPs and bacteria) and wind speed. We conclude that it is likely that TEPs were transported from the sea surface to the atmosphere together with bacteria to form fluorescent bioaerosols.

Kaori Kawana et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-74', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Apr 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-74', Anonymous Referee #2, 02 Jun 2021

Kaori Kawana et al.

Kaori Kawana et al.

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Short summary
Atmospheric autofluorescent particles observed over the central Pacific Ocean were identified as bioaerosols from comparisons to DNA nuclear staining method. Their number concentrations in the pristine marine airmasses showed high correlations with concentrations of bacteria and Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEPs) in the surface seawater, providing strong evidence of their marine origins. We propose equations to derive the atmospheric bioaerosol number concentrations from oceanic parameters.
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