Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-724
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-724

  21 Sep 2021

21 Sep 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Biomass burning and marine aerosol processing over the southeast Atlantic Ocean: A TEM single particle analysis

Caroline Dang1,2, Michal Segal-Rozenhaimer3,4, Haochi Che3, Lu Zhang3, Paola Formenti5, Jonathan Taylor6, Amie Dobracki7, Sara Purdue7, Pui-Shan Wong8, Athanios Nenes8, Arthur Sedlacek9, Hugh Coe6, Jens Redemann10, Paquita Zuidema7, and James Haywood11,12 Caroline Dang et al.
  • 1NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, 94035, USA
  • 2Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, Maryland, 21046, USA
  • 3Department of Geophysics, Porter School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel
  • 4Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, USA
  • 5Université de Paris and Univ Paris Est Creteil, CNRS, LISA, F-75013 Paris, France
  • 6Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
  • 7Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA
  • 8Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, CA
  • 9Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven, NY, USA
  • 10School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA
  • 11College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Science, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
  • 12Met Office, Exeter, EX1 3PB, UK

Abstract. This study characterizes single particle aerosol composition from filters collected during the ObseRvations of Aerosols above CLouds and their intEractionS (ORACLES) and CLoud–Aerosol–Radiation Interaction and Forcing: Year 2017 (CLARIFY-2017) campaigns. In particular the study describes aged biomass burning aerosol (BBA), its interaction with the marine boundary layer and the influence of biomass burning (BB) air on marine aerosol. The study finds evidence of BBA influenced by marine boundary layer processing as well as sea salt influenced by BB air. Secondary chloride aerosols were observed in clean marine air as well as in BB-influenced air in the free troposphere. Higher volatility organic aerosol appears to be associated with increased age of biomass burning plumes, and photolysis may be a mechanism for this increased volatility. Aqueous processing and interaction with the marine boundary layer air may be a mechanism for the presence of sodium on many aged potassium salts. By number, biomass burning potassium salts and modified sea salts are the most observed particles on filter samples. These results suggest that atmospheric processing such as photolysis and cloud processing, rather than BB fuel type, has a major role in the elemental composition and morphology of aged BBA.

Caroline Dang et al.

Status: open (until 02 Nov 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-724', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Oct 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-724', Anonymous Referee #2, 15 Oct 2021 reply

Caroline Dang et al.

Caroline Dang et al.

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Short summary
We used TEM to analyze aged biomass burning aerosol from Africa. We found that the volatility of organic aerosol increases with biomass burning plume age, that black carbon is often mixed with potassium salts, and that the marine atmosphere can change biomass burning aerosol through incorporation of sodium into particles. We found regions dominated by chloride particles without the presence of Na, and that marine salts are more processed when mixed with biomass burning plumes.
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