Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-675
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-675

  08 Sep 2021

08 Sep 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Enhanced summertime ozone and SOA from biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions due to vegetation biomass variability during 1981–2018 in China

Jing Cao1, Shuping Situ2, Yufang Hao3, Shaodong Xie4, and Lingyu Li1 Jing Cao et al.
  • 1College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071, China
  • 2Foshan Ecological and Environmental Monitoring Station of Guangdong Province, Foshan 528000, China
  • 3Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Energy and Environment Research Division, Paul Scherrer Institute/ETH, Villigen 5232, Switzerland
  • 4State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China

Abstract. Coordinated control of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has become a new and urgent issue for China’s air pollution control. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are important precursors of O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. China experienced a rapid increase in BVOC emissions as a result of increased vegetation biomass. We applied WRF-Chem3.8 coupling with MEGAN2.1 to conduct long-term simulations for impacts of BVOC emissions on O3 and SOA during 1981–2018, using the emission factors extrapolated by localized emission rates and annual vegetation biomass. In summer of 2018, BVOC emissions are 9.91 Tg (in June), which lead to an average increase of 8.6 ppb (16.75 % of the total) in daily maximum 8-h (MDA8) O3 concentration and 0.84 μg m−3 (73.15 % of the total) in SOA over China. The highest contribution to O3 is concentrated in the Great Khingan Mountains, Qinling Mountains, and most southern regions, while southern areas for SOA. Isoprene has the greatest contribution to O3 while monoterpene has the largest SOA production. BVOC emissions have distinguished impacts in different regions. Chengdu-Chongqing (CC) region has the highest O3 and SOA generated by BVOCs while Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region has the lowest. From 1981 to 2018, the interannual variation of BVOC emissions caused by increasing leaf biomass results in O3 concentration increasing by 7.38 % at an average rate of 0.11 ppb yr−1, and SOA increasing by 39.30 % at an average rate of 0.008 μg m−3 yr−1. Due to the different changing trends of leaf biomass by regions and vegetation types, O3 and SOA show different interannual variations. Fenwei Plain (FWP), Yangtze River Delta (YRD), and Pearl River Delta (PRD) regions have the most rapid O3 increment while the increasing rate of SOA in CC is the highest. BTH has the smallest enhancement in O3 and SOA concentration. This study will help to recognize the impact of historical BVOC emissions on O3 and SOA, and further provide the reliable scientific basis for the precise prevention and control of air pollution in China.

Jing Cao et al.

Status: open (until 20 Oct 2021)

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Jing Cao et al.

Jing Cao et al.

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Short summary
Based on the localized emission factor and the high-resolution vegetation data, we simulated the impacts of BVOC emissions on O3 and SOA during 1981–2018 in China. The interannual variation of BVOC emissions caused by increasing leaf biomass results in O3 and SOA concentrations increasing at average annual rates of 0.11 ppb and 0.008 μg m−3, respectively. It shows different variations which can be attributed to the different changing trends of leaf biomass by regions and vegetation types.
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