Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-558
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-558

  26 Jul 2021

26 Jul 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

The vertical aerosol type distribution above Israel – 2 years of lidar observations at the coastal city of Haifa

Birgit Heese1, Athena Augusta Floutsi1, Holger Baars1, Dietrich Althausen1, Julian Hofer1, Alina Herzog1, Silke Mewes1, Martin Radenz1, and Yoav Y. Schechner2 Birgit Heese et al.
  • 1Leibniz Institute for Tropspheric Research - TROPOS, Permoserstr.15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
  • 2Viterbi Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Technion, Haifa, Israel

Abstract. For the first time, vertically resolved long-term lidar measurements of the aerosol distribution were taken in Haifa, Israel. The measurements were performed by a PollyXT multi-wavelength Raman and polarization lidar. The lidar was measuring continuously over a 2-year period from March 2017 to May 2019. The resulting data set is a series of manually evaluated lidar optical property profiles. To identify the aerosol types in the observed layers, a novel aerosol typing method developed at TROPOS is used. This method applies optimal estimation to a combination of the lidar-derived intensive aerosol properties to determine the statistically most-likely contribution per aerosol component in terms of relative volume. A case study that shows several elevated aerosol layers illustrates this method and shows e.g. that coarse dust particles are observed up to 5 km height over Israel. From the whole data set, the seasonal distribution of the observed aerosol components over Israel is derived. Throughout all seasons, and with the highest contributions in summer, autumn, and winter, coarse spherical particles like sea salt, due to the coastal site, but also hygroscopic grown continental aerosol that was transported over the Mediterranean Sea was observed. During spring, coarse non-spherical particles attributed to desert dust were the mostly observed particles. This is consistent with the distinct dust season in Spring in Israel. An automated time-height-resolved air mass source attribution method identifies the dust sources in the Saharan and the Arabian deserts. Fine mode spherical particles also contribute significantly to the observed aerosol mixture during the most seasons. These particles originate mainly from the industrial region at the bay of Haifa.

Birgit Heese et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-558', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-558', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Oct 2021

Birgit Heese et al.

Birgit Heese et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 516 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
408 98 10 516 3 3
  • HTML: 408
  • PDF: 98
  • XML: 10
  • Total: 516
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 26 Jul 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 26 Jul 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 504 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 504 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 25 Oct 2021
Download
Short summary
The aerosol distribution over Haifa, Israel, was measured for two years by a laser based vertically resolved measurement technique called lidar. From these data, the aerosol types and their percentages of the observed aerosol mixtures were identified in terms of their size and shape. We found mostly desert dust from the surrounding deserts and sea salt from the close by Mediterranean Sea. But, also aerosol from anthropogenic and industrial pollution from local and far away sources were detected.
Altmetrics