Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-492
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-492

  03 Aug 2021

03 Aug 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Responses of surface ozone to future agricultural ammonia emissions and subsequent nitrogen deposition through terrestrial ecosystem changes

Xueying Liu1,a, Amos P. K. Tai1,2,3, and Ka Ming Fung1,b Xueying Liu et al.
  • 1Earth System Science Programme and Graduate Division of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • 2Institute of Environment, Energy and Sustainability, and State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • 3Center for Soybean Research of the State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • anow at: Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA
  • bnow at: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract. With the rising food demands from the future world population, more intense agricultural activities are expected to cause substantial perturbations to the global nitrogen cycle, aggravating surface air pollution and imposing stress on terrestrial ecosystems. Much less studied, however, is how the terrestrial ecosystem changes induced by agricultural nitrogen deposition may modify biosphere-atmosphere exchange and further exert secondary feedback effects on global air quality. Here we examined the responses of surface ozone air quality to terrestrial ecosystem changes caused by 2000-to-2050 changes in agricultural ammonia emission and the subsequent nitrogen deposition by asynchronously coupling between the land and atmosphere components within the Community Earth System Model framework. We found that global gross primary production is enhanced by 2.1 Pg C yr−1 following a 20 % (20 Tg N yr−1) increase in global nitrogen deposition by the end of year 2050 in response to rising agricultural ammonia emission. Leaf area index was simulated to be higher by up to 0.3–0.4 m2 m−2 over most tropical grasslands and croplands, and 0.1–0.2 m2 m−2 across boreal and temperate forests at midlatitudes. Around 0.1–0.4 m increases in canopy height were found in boreal and temperate forests, and ~0.1 m increases in tropical grasslands and croplands. We found that these vegetation changes could lead to surface ozone changes by ~0.5 ppbv when prescribed meteorology was used (i.e., large-scale meteorological responses to terrestrial changes were not allowed), while surface ozone could typically be modified by 2–3 ppbv when meteorology was dynamically simulated in response to vegetation changes. Rising soil NOx emission from 7.9 to 8.7 Tg N yr−1 could enhance surface ozone by 2–3 ppbv with both prescribed and dynamic meteorology. We thus conclude that following enhanced nitrogen deposition, the modification of the meteorological environment induced by vegetation changes and soil biogeochemical changes are the more important pathways that can modulate future ozone pollution, representing a novel linkage between agricultural activities and ozone air quality.

Xueying Liu et al.

Status: open (until 29 Sep 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-492', Anonymous Referee #1, 24 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-492', Anonymous Referee #2, 22 Sep 2021 reply

Xueying Liu et al.

Xueying Liu et al.

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Short summary
With the rising food need, more intense agricultural activities will cause substantial perturbations to the nitrogen cycle, aggravating surface air pollution and imposing stress on terrestrial ecosystems. We studied how these ecosystem changes may modify biosphere-atmosphere exchange and further exert secondary effects on air quality, and demonstrated a linkage between agricultural activities and ozone air quality via the modulation of vegetation and soil biogeochemistry by nitrogen deposition.
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