Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-436
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-436

  28 Jun 2021

28 Jun 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Comparison of influence between two types of cold surge on haze dispersion in Eastern China

Shiyue Zhang1, Gang Zeng1, Xiaoye Yang1, Ruixi Wu2, and Zhicong Yin1,3 Shiyue Zhang et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education (KLME), Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, 210044, China
  • 2Meteorological Bureau of Jiading District, Shanghai 201815, China
  • 3Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Zhuhai), Zhuhai, 519080, China

Abstract. Cold surge (CS) is considered as a favorable weather process to improve air quality and is widely recognized. However, there is no detailed study on the differences in the dispersion ability of different types of CSs to haze days in eastern China (HDEC). This paper uses the hierarchical clustering algorithm to classify the cool season (November to February of the following year) CSs across eastern China into blocking and wave-train CSs and compares their influences on the number of HDEC from 1980 to 2017. Results show that the wave-train CS can significantly improve the visibility in eastern China and generally make the high air quality last for about 2 days longer than the blocking CS, which indicates that the blocking CS has a weaker ability to dissipate HDEC compared with the wave-train CS. The CSs affect the HDEC by changing these meteorological elements like thermal inversion potential, horizontal surface wind, sea level pressure (SLP), and surface air temperature (SAT). 4 days after the CSs outbreak, the variations of thermal inversion potential and horizontal surface wind of two types of CSs tend to be consistent. However, the negative SAT anomalies, and the positive SLP anomalies caused by the blocking CSs lasted shorter than those caused by the wave-train CSs, which forms favorable conditions for the rapid growth of HDEC. Furthermore, results show that in recent years, especially after the 1990s, the frequency of wave-train CSs has decreased significantly, while the frequency of blocking CSs has slightly increased, indicating that the overall ability of CSs to dissipate HDEC has weakened in general.

Shiyue Zhang et al.

Status: open (until 19 Aug 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-436', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Jul 2021 reply

Shiyue Zhang et al.

Shiyue Zhang et al.

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Short summary
This study classified the winter cold surge in eastern China into blocking cold surge and wave-train cold surge, and investigated the difference of haze dispersion ability between the two types of cold surge. The results show that the haze dispersion of blocking cold surge is weaker than that of wave-train cold surge. In the past 4 decades, the frequency of wave-train (blocking) cold surge shows a downward (upward) trend, which means that the ability of cold surge to disperse haze is declining.
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