Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-262
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-262

  26 Apr 2021

26 Apr 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Measurement report: The chemical composition and temporal variability of aerosol particles at Tuktoyaktuk, Canada during the Year of Polar Prediction Special Observing Period

John MacInnis1, Jai Prakash Chaubey1, Crystal Weagle1,2, David Atkinson3, and Rachel Ying-Wen Chang1 John MacInnis et al.
  • 1Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, B3H 4R2, Canada
  • 2Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, 63130-4899, United States of America
  • 3Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, V8P 5C2, Canada

Abstract. The chemical composition, sources, and concentrations of aerosol particles vary on a seasonal basis in the Arctic. While existing research has focused on understanding the occurrence of aerosol particles during the Arctic winter and spring, less is known of their occurrence during the Arctic summer. In this study, atmospheric aerosol particle chemical composition and concentration were determined during July–September 2018 at Tuktoyaktuk, NT, Canada (69.4° N, 133.0° W) to coincide with the Year of Polar Prediction’s 2nd Special Observing Period in the Arctic. The chemical composition of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10-2.5) aerosol filter samples suggests the ocean, mineral/road dust, and combustion were sources of the sampled aerosol particles. Mass concentrations of PM2 and PM10, estimated from optical particle counter measurements, remained within a similar range during the study. However, elevated mass concentrations coincided with a festival in the community of Tuktoyaktuk, suggesting local human activity was an important source of aerosol particles. Mass concentrations of PM2, which promote negative health effects in humans, were significantly lower at Tuktoyaktuk than the national air quality standard recommended by the Government of Canada. These measurements provide an important baseline to compare with future measurements associated with the assessment of aerosol chemistry and air quality in the Arctic.

John MacInnis et al.

Status: open (until 21 Jun 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

John MacInnis et al.

John MacInnis et al.

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Short summary
This study measured particulate matter in the western Canadian Arctic during 2018 as part of the Year of Polar Prediction. It was found that the particles were likely from the ocean, soil, road dust, and combustion. The concentrations of small aerosol particles, which can affect human health, were low, suggesting they had little impact on local air quality. These results can be used to understand future changes in local aerosol particle sources and concentrations.
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