Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-141
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-141

  12 Mar 2021

12 Mar 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Modelling the influence of biotic plant stress on atmospheric aerosol particle processes throughout a growing season

Ditte Taipale1,2,3,4, Veli-Matti Kerminen1, Mikael Ehn1, Markku Kulmala1, and Ülo Niinemets2 Ditte Taipale et al.
  • 1Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
  • 2Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, Tartu 51006, Estonia
  • 3Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Forest Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, PO Box 27, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
  • 4Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station, Hyytiäläntie 124, 35500 Korkeakoski, Finland

Abstract. Most trees emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) continuously throughout their life, but the rate of emission, and spectrum of emitted VOCs, become substantially altered when the trees experience stress. Still, models to predict the emissions of VOCs do not account for perturbations caused by biotic plant stress. Considering that such stresses have generally been forecast to increase in both frequency and severity in future climate, the neglect of plant stress-induced emissions in models might be one of the key obstacles for realistic climate change predictions, since changes in VOC concentrations are known to greatly influence atmospheric aerosol processes. Thus, we constructed a model to study the impact of biotic plant stresses on new particle formation and growth throughout a full growing season. We simulated the influence on aerosol processes caused by herbivory by European gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) and autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) feeding on pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and mountain birch (Betula pubescens var. pumila), respectively, and also fungal infections of pedunculate oak and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera var. suaveolens) by oak powdery mildew (Erysiphe alphitoides) and poplar rust (Melampsora larici-populina), respectively. Our modelling results indicate that all the investigated plant stresses are capable of substantially perturbing both the number and size of aerosol particles in atmospherically relevant conditions, with increases in the amount of newly formed particles by up to about one order of magnitude and additional daily growth of up to almost 50 nm. We also showed that it can be more important to account for biotic plant stresses in models than significant variations in e.g. leaf area index, and temperature and light conditions, which are currently the main parameters controlling predictions of VOC emissions. Our study, thus, demonstrates that biotic plant stress can be highly atmospherically relevant and it supports biotic plant stress emissions to be integrated into numerical models for prediction of atmospheric chemistry and physics, including climate change projection models.

Ditte Taipale et al.

Status: open (until 07 May 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Ditte Taipale et al.

Ditte Taipale et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 218 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
172 44 2 218 0 3
  • HTML: 172
  • PDF: 44
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 218
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 12 Mar 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 12 Mar 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 209 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 209 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 15 Apr 2021
Download
Short summary
Larval feeding and fungal infections of leaves can change the emission of volatile compounds from plants a lot and thereby influence aerosol processes in the air. We developed a model which considers the dynamics of larvae and fungi and the dependency of the emission on the severity of stress. We show that the infections can be highly atmospherically relevant during long periods of time and at times be more important to consider than the parameters which are currently used in emission models.
Altmetrics