Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-123
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-123

  15 Feb 2021

15 Feb 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Comment on Review of Experimental Studies of Secondary Ice Production by Korolev and Leisner (2020)

Vaughan T. J. Phillips1, Jun-Ichi Yano2, Akash Deshmukh1, and Deepak Waman1 Vaughan T. J. Phillips et al.
  • 1Department of Physical Geography, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden
  • 2CNRM, UMR 3589 (CNRS), Meteo-France, 31057 Toulouse Cedex, France

Abstract. This is a comment on the article Review of Experimental Studies of Secondary Ice Production by Korolev and Leisner (2020, hereafter termed KL2020), referring to the discussion about ice fragmentation. We argue that the only two studies characterising fragmentation in ice-ice collisions are not so erroneous as to prevent their use in representing this breakup in numerical models, contrary to the impression given in the review. A scaling analysis suggests that breakup of ice during sublimation can make a significant, albeit lesser, contribution to ice enhancement in clouds.

Vaughan T. J. Phillips et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-123', Andrew Heymsfield, 21 Feb 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Vaughan Phillips, 21 Feb 2021
      • AC2: 'Reply on AC1', Vaughan Phillips, 22 Feb 2021
        • CC1: 'Reply on AC2', Jacob Carlin, 24 Feb 2021
  • CC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-123', Thomas Leisner, 02 Mar 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on CC2', Vaughan Phillips, 22 Mar 2021
  • CC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-123', Alexei Korolev, 12 Mar 2021
    • CC4: 'Reply on CC3', Akash Deshmukh, 20 Apr 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-123', Anonymous Referee #2, 25 Apr 2021

Vaughan T. J. Phillips et al.

Vaughan T. J. Phillips et al.

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Latest update: 05 May 2021
Short summary
For decades now, high concentrations of ice observed in precipitating mixed-phase clouds have created an enigma. Such concentrations are higher than can be explained by the action of aerosols or by the spontaneous freezing of most cloud-droplets. Partly, the controversy has persisted due to the lack of laboratory experimentation in ice microphysics, especially regarding fragmentation of ice, a topic reviewed by a recent paper. Our comment attempts to clarify some issues about that review.
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