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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-315
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-315
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  14 Apr 2020

14 Apr 2020

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A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ACP and is expected to appear here in due course.

Global-scale distribution of ozone in the remote troposphere from ATom and HIPPO airborne field missions

Ilann Bourgeois1,2, Jeffrey Peischl1,2, Chelsea R. Thompson1,2, Kenneth C. Aikin1,2, Teresa Campos3, Hannah Clark4, Róisín Commane5, Bruce Daube6, Glenn W. Diskin7, James W. Elkins8, Ru-Shan Gao2, Audrey Gaudel1,2, Eric J. Hintsa1,8, Bryan J. Johnson8, Rigel Kivi9, Kathryn McKain1,8, Fred L. Moore1,8, David D. Parrish1,2, Richard Querel10, Eric Ray1,2, Ricardo Sánchez11, Colm Sweeney7, David W. Tarasick12, Anne M. Thompson13, Valérie Thouret14, Jacquelyn C. Witte3, Steve C. Wofsy6, and Thomas B. Ryerson2 Ilann Bourgeois et al.
  • 1Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of ColoradoBoulder, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 2NOAA CSL, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 3National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 4IAGOS-AISBL, Brussels, Belgium
  • 5Departmentof Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
  • 6School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
  • 7NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA
  • 8NOAA GML, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 9Finnish Meteorological Institute, Space and Earth Observation Centre, Sodankylä, Finland
  • 10National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Lauder, New Zealand
  • 11Servicio Meteorológico Nacional, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • 12Experimental Studies Research Division, MSC/Environment and Climate Change Canada, Downsview, Ontario, Canada
  • 13Earth Sciences Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
  • 14Laboratoire d'Aérologie, CNRS and Université Paul Sabatier, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France

Abstract. Ozone is a key constituent of the troposphere where it drives photochemical processes, impacts air quality, and acts as a climate forcer. Large-scale in situ observations of ozone commensurate with the grid resolution of current Earth system models are necessary to validate model outputs and satellite retrievals. In this paper, we examine measurements from the Atmospheric Tomography (ATom, 4 deployments in 2016–2018) and the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO; 5 deployments in 2009–2011) experiments, two global-scale airborne campaigns covering the Pacific (HIPPO and ATom) and Atlantic (ATom) basins.

ATom and HIPPO represent the first global-scale, vertically resolved measurements of O3 distributions throughout the troposphere, with HIPPO sampling the Pacific basin and ATom sampling both the Pacific and Atlantic basins. Given the relatively limited temporal resolution of these two campaigns, we first compare ATom and HIPPO ozone data to longer-term observational records to establish the representativeness of our dataset. We show that these two airborne campaigns captured on average 53, 54, and 38 % of the ozone variability in the marine boundary layer, free troposphere, and upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS), respectively, at nine well-established ozonesonde sites. Additionally, ATom captured the most frequent ozone concentrations measured by regular commercial aircraft flights in the northern Atlantic UTLS. We then use the repeated vertical profiles carried out during these two campaigns to provide a global-scale picture of tropospheric ozone spatial and vertical distributions throughout the remote troposphere. We highlight a clear hemispheric gradient, with greater ozone in the northern hemisphere consistent with greater precursor emissions. We also show that the ozone distribution below 8 km was similar in the extra-tropics of the Atlantic and Pacific basins due to zonal circulation patterns. However, twice as much ozone was found in the tropical Atlantic than in the tropical Pacific, due to well-documented dynamical patterns transporting continental air masses over the Atlantic. We finally show that the seasonal variability of tropospheric ozone over the Pacific and the Atlantic basins is driven by transported continental plumes and photochemistry, and the vertical distribution is driven by photochemistry and mixing with stratospheric air. This new dataset is essential for improving our understanding of both ozone production and loss processes in remote regions, as well as the influence of anthropogenic emissions on baseline ozone.

Ilann Bourgeois et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Ilann Bourgeois et al.

Data sets

ATom: L2 In Situ Measurements from NOAA Nitrogen Oxides and Ozone (NOyO3) Instrument T. B. Ryerson, C. R. Thompson, J. Peischl, and I. Bourgeois https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1734

ATom: L2 In Situ Atmospheric Water Vapor from the Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH) G.S. Diskin and J. P. DiGangi https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1710

Model code and software

ATom: Measurements from the UAS Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species (UCATS) J. W. Elkins, E. J. Hintsa, and F. L. Moore https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1750

Ilann Bourgeois et al.

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