Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-174
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-174

  24 Mar 2020

24 Mar 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ACP and is expected to appear here in due course.

Contributions to OH reactivity from unexplored volatile organic compounds measured by PTR-ToF-MS – A case study in a suburban forest of the Seoul Metropolitan Area during KORUS-AQ 2016

Dianne Sanchez1, Roger Seco1,a,b, Dasa Gu1, Alex Guenther1, John Mak2, Youngjae Lee3, Danbi Kim3, Joonyoung Ahn3, Don Blake4, Scott Herndon5, Daun Jeong1, John T. Sullivan6, Thomas Mcgee6, and Saewung Kim1 Dianne Sanchez et al.
  • 1Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine CA 92697, USA
  • 2School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brooke University, Stony Brook, NY 1111794, USA
  • 3National Institute of Environmental Research, Inchoen 22689, South Korea
  • 4Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, Irvine CA 92697, USA
  • 5Aerodyne Research Inc., Billerica MA 01821, USA
  • 6NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
  • anow at: Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
  • bnow at: Center for Permafrost (CENPERM), Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management , University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Abstract. We report OH reactivity observations by a chemical ionization mass spectrometer – comparative reactivity method (CIMS-CRM) instrument in a suburban forest of the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA) during Korea US Air Quality Study (KORUS-AQ 2016) from mid-May to mid-June of 2016. A comprehensive observational suite was deployed to quantify reactive trace gases inside of the forest canopy including a high-resolution proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). An average OH reactivity of 30.7 ± 5.1 s−1 was observed, while the OH reactivity calculated from CO, NO + NO2 (NOx), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and 14 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 11.8 ± 1.0 s−1. An analysis of 346 peaks from the PTR-ToF-MS accounted for an additional 6.0 ± 2.2 s−1 of the total measured OH reactivity, leaving 42.0 % missing OH reactivity. The missing OH reactivity most likely comes from VOC oxidation products of both biogenic and anthropogenic origin.

Dianne Sanchez et al.

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Dianne Sanchez et al.

Dianne Sanchez et al.

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