Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1312
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1312

  11 Feb 2021

11 Feb 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Influence of sea salt aerosols on the development of Mediterranean tropical-like cyclones

Enrique Pravia-Sarabia1, Juan José Gómez-Navarro1, Pedro Jiménez-Guerrero1,2, and Juan Pedro Montávez1 Enrique Pravia-Sarabia et al.
  • 1Physics of the Earth, Regional Campus of International Excellence (CEIR) “Campus Mare Nostrum”, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
  • 2Biomedical Research Institute of Murcia (IMIB-Arrixaca), 30120 Murcia, Spain

Abstract. Medicanes are mesoscale tropical-like cyclones that develop in the Mediterranean basin and represent a great hazard for the coastal population. The skill to accurately simulate them is of utmost importance to prevent economical and personal damages. Medicanes are fuelled by the latent heat released in the condensation process associated to convective activity, which is regulated by the presence and activation of cloud condensation nuclei, originated mainly from sea salt aerosols (SSA) for marine environments. Henceforth, the purpose of this contribution is twofold: assessing the effects of an interactive calculation of SSA on the strengthening and persistence of medicanes; and providing insight on the casuistry and sensitivities around their simulation processes. To this end, a set of simulations has been conducted with a chemistry/meteorology coupled model considering prescribed aerosols (PA) and interactive aerosol concentrations (IA). The results indicate that IA produces longer-lasting and more intense medicanes. Further, the role of the initialization time and nudging strategies for medicane simulations has been explored. Overall, the results suggest that (1) the application of spectral nudging dampens the effects of IA; (2) the initialization time introduces a strong variability on the storm dynamics; and (3) wind-SSA feedback is crucial and should be considered when studying medicanes.

Enrique Pravia-Sarabia et al.

Status: open (until 08 Apr 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Enrique Pravia-Sarabia et al.

Enrique Pravia-Sarabia et al.

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Short summary
Given the hazardous nature of medicanes, studies focused on understanding and quantifying the processes governing their formation have become paramount for present and future disaster risk reduction. Therefore, enhancing the modelling and forecasting capabilities of such events is of crucial importance. In this sense, authors find that the microphysical processes, and specifically the wind-sea salt aerosols feedback, play a key role on their development, and thus should not be neglected.
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