Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 5.414
IF5.414
IF 5-year value: 5.958
IF 5-year
5.958
CiteScore value: 9.7
CiteScore
9.7
SNIP value: 1.517
SNIP1.517
IPP value: 5.61
IPP5.61
SJR value: 2.601
SJR2.601
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 191
Scimago H
index
191
h5-index value: 89
h5-index89
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1114
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1114
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  02 Nov 2020

02 Nov 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Compositions and mixing states of aerosol particles by aircraft observations in the Arctic springtime, 2018

Kouji Adachi1, Naga Oshima1, Sho Ohata2,3,4, Atsushi Yoshida2, Nobuhiro Moteki2, and Makoto Koike2 Kouji Adachi et al.
  • 1Department of Atmosphere, Ocean, and Earth System Modeling Research, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
  • 2Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  • 3Institute for Space–Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
  • 4Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Abstract. Aerosol particles were collected at various altitudes in the Arctic during the Polar Airborne Measurements and Arctic Regional Climate Model Simulation Project (PAMARCMiP 2018) conducted in the early spring of 2018. The composition, size, number fraction, and mixing state of individual aerosol particles were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their sources and transport were evaluated by numerical model simulations. We found that sulfate, sea-salt, mineral-dust, K-bearing, and carbonaceous particles were the major aerosol constituents and were internally mixed. The number fraction of mineral-dust and sea-salt particles decreased with increasing altitude. The K-bearing particles increased within a biomass burning (BB) plume at altitudes > 3900 m, which originated from Siberia. Chlorine in sea-salt particles was replaced with sulfate at high altitudes. These results suggest that the sources, transport, and aging of Arctic aerosols largely vary depending on the altitude and airmass history. We also provide the occurrences of solid-particle inclusions (soot, fly-ash, and Fe-aggregate particles), some of which are light-absorbing and potential ice-nucleating particles. Our TEM measurements revealed, for the first time, the detailed mixing state of individual particles at various altitudes in the Arctic. This information facilitates the accurate evaluation of the aerosol influences on Arctic haze, radiation balance, cloud formation, and snow/ice albedo when deposited.

Kouji Adachi et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 28 Dec 2020)
Status: open (until 28 Dec 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Kouji Adachi et al.

Kouji Adachi et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 35 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
25 8 2 35 6 2 3
  • HTML: 25
  • PDF: 8
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 35
  • Supplement: 6
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 02 Nov 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 02 Nov 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 187 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 186 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 25 Nov 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Aerosol particles influence the Arctic climate by interacting with solar radiation, forming clouds, and melting surface snow and ice. Individual-particle analyses using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and model simulations provide evidence of biomass burning and anthropogenic contributions to the Arctic aerosols by showing a wide range of compositions and mixing states depending on sampling altitude. Our results reveal the aerosol aging processes and climate influences in the Arctic.
Aerosol particles influence the Arctic climate by interacting with solar radiation, forming...
Citation
Altmetrics