Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1100
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1100

  29 Oct 2020

29 Oct 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal ACP and is expected to appear here in due course.

Aerosol characteristics at the Southern Great Plains site during the HI-SCALE campaign

Jiumeng Liu1,3, Liz Alexander2, Jerome D. Fast1, Rodica Lindenmaier1, and John E. Shilling1 Jiumeng Liu et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
  • 2Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
  • 3School of Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001, China

Abstract. Large uncertainties exist in global climate model predictions of radiative forcing due to insufficient understanding and simplified numerical representation of cloud formation and cloud-aerosol interactions. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols and Land Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign was conducted near the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma to provide a better understanding of land-atmosphere interactions, aerosol and cloud properties, and the influence of aerosol and land-atmosphere interactions on cloud formation. The HI-SCALE campaign consisted of two Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) (April–May, and August–September, 2016), during which coincident measurements were conducted both on the G-1 aircraft platform and at the SGP ground site. In this study we focus on the observations at the SGP ground site. An Aerodyne HR-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and an Ionicon Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed, characterizing chemistry of non-refractory aerosol and trace gases, respectively. Contributions from various aerosol sources, including biogenic and biomass burning emissions, were retrieved using factor analysis of the AMS data. In general, the organic aerosols at the SGP site was highly oxidized, with OOA identified as the dominant factor for both the spring and summer IOP though more aged in spring. Cases of IEPOX SOA and biomass burning events were further investigated to understand additional sources of organic aerosol. Unlike other regions largely impacted by IEPOX chemistry, the IEPOX SOA at SGP was more highly oxygenated, likely due to the relatively weak local emissions of isoprene. Biogenic emissions appear to largely control the formation of OA during HI-SCALE campaign. Potential HOM (highly-oxygenated molecule) chemistry likely contributes to the highly-oxygenated feature of aerosols at the SGP site, with impacts on new particle formation and global climate.

Jiumeng Liu et al.

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Jiumeng Liu et al.

Jiumeng Liu et al.

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Short summary
To bridge the gaps in modeling and observational results due to insufficient understanding of aerosol properties, co-located measurements of aerosols and trace gases were conducted at SGP during HI-SCALE campaign. Organic aerosols at the SGP site exhibited to be highly oxidized, and biogenic emissions appear to largely control the formation of organic aerosols. Seasonal variations of sources and meteorological impacts likely resulted in the highly oxygenated feature of aerosols.
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