Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1093
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1093

  23 Nov 2020

23 Nov 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Tropospheric and stratospheric wildfire smoke profiling with lidar: Mass, surface area, CCN and INP retrieval

Albert Ansmann1, Kevin Ohneiser1, Rodanthi-Elisavet Mamouri2,3, Daniel A. Knopf4, Igor Veselovskii5, Holger Baars1, Ronny Engelmann1, Andreas Foth6, Cristofer Jimenez1, Patric Seifert1, and Boris Barja7 Albert Ansmann et al.
  • 1Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig, Germany
  • 2Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus
  • 3ERATOSTHENES Center of Excellence, Limassol, Cyprus
  • 4School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000, USA
  • 5Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
  • 6Leipzig Institute for Meteorology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
  • 7Atmospheric Research Laboratory, University of Magallanes, Punta Arenas, Chile

Abstract. We present retrievals of tropospheric and stratospheric height profiles of particle mass, volume, and surface area concentrations in the case of wildfire smoke layers as well as estimates of smoke-related cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations from single-wavelength backscatter lidar measurements at ground and in space. A central role in the data analysis play conversion factors to convert the measured optical into microphysical properties. The set of needed conversion parameters for wildfire smoke are derived from AERONET observations of major smoke events caused by record-breaking wildfires in western Canada in August 2017 and southeastern Australia in January–February 2020. The new smoke analysis scheme is applied to stratospheric CALIPSO observations of fresh smoke plumes over northern Canada in 2017 and New Zealand in January 2020 and to ground-based lidar observation in southern Chile in aged Australian smoke layers in January 2020. These case studies show the potential of spaceborne and ground-based lidars to document large-scale and long-lasting wildfire smoke events in large detail and thus to provide valuable information for climate-, cloud-, and air chemistry modeling efforts performed to investigate the role of wildfire smoke in the atmospheric system.

Albert Ansmann et al.

 
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Albert Ansmann et al.

Albert Ansmann et al.

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Short summary
We present retrievals of tropospheric and stratospheric height profiles of particle mass, volume, surface area concentration of wildfire smoke layers and related cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations. The new analysis scheme is applied to stratospheric CALIPSO observations of fresh smoke plumes over northern Canada in 2017 and New Zealand in January 2020 and to lidar observation of aged Australian wildfire smoke in southern Chile.
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