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https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1062
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-1062
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  16 Nov 2020

16 Nov 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Measurement report: Source characteristics of water-soluble organic carbon in PM2.5 at two sites in Japan, as assessed by long-term observation and stable carbon isotope ratio

Nana Suto1 and Hiroto Kawashima2 Nana Suto and Hiroto Kawashima
  • 1Energy and Environment Research Division, Japan Automobile Research Institute, Tsukuba, 3050822, Japan
  • 2Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo, 0150055, Japan

Abstract. The sources and seasonal trends of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in carbonaceous aerosols are of significant interest. From July 2017 to July 2019, we collected samples of PM2.5 (particulate matter, aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm) from one suburban and one rural site in Japan. The average δ13CWSOC was −25.2 ± 1.1 ‰ and −24.6 ± 2.4 ‰ at the suburban site and rural site, respectively. At the suburban site, the δ13CWSOC was consistent with the δ13C of levoglucosan, a tracer of biomass burning, and a high correlation was found between WSOC concentration and non-sea-salt potassium concentration, another tracer of biomass burning, suggesting that the main source of WSOC was biomass from burning of rice straw. At the rural site, the δ13CWSOC was significantly heavier in winter (−22.6 ± 1.3 ‰) than in summer (−27.4 ± 0.7 ‰; p < 0.01). The heavy δ13CWSOC in winter was a result mainly of biomass burning and the aging of OC during long-term transport, whereas the light δ13CWSOC in summer was a result mainly of the formation of secondary organic aerosols from biogenic volatile organic compounds. Thus, our δ13CWSOC approach was useful to elucidate the sources and atmospheric processes that contribute to seasonal variations of WSOC concentrations.

Nana Suto and Hiroto Kawashima

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Nana Suto and Hiroto Kawashima

Nana Suto and Hiroto Kawashima

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Short summary
The sources and seasonal trends of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 on long-term at two sites in Japan are investigated by carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of WSOC. At the rural site, the source of WSOC in winter was estimated to the biomass burning and the aging of organic carbon, whereas the source in summer was the formation of secondary organic aerosols from biogenic volatile organic compounds. Our δ13C of WSOC approach was useful to elucidate the sources and atmospheric processes.
The sources and seasonal trends of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 on long-term at...
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