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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-1182
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-1182
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  28 Jan 2020

28 Jan 2020

Review status
This preprint was under review for the journal ACP. A revision for further review has not been submitted.

Modelling mixed-phase clouds with large-eddy model UCLALES-SALSA

Jaakko Ahola1, Hannele Korhonen1, Juha Tonttila2, Sami Romakkaniemi2, Harri Kokkola2, and Tomi Raatikainen1 Jaakko Ahola et al.
  • 1Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland
  • 2Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio, Finland

Abstract. The large-eddy model UCLALES-SALSA, with exceptionally detailed aerosol description for both aerosol number and chemical composition, has been extended for ice and mixed-phase clouds. Comparison to a previous mixed-phase cloud model intercomparison study confirmed the accuracy of newly implemented ice microphysics. Further simulation with a heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme, where also ice nucleating particles (INP) are a prognostic variable, captured the typical layered structure of Arctic mid-altitude mixed-phase cloud: a liquid layer near cloud top and ice within and below the liquid layer. In addition, the simulation showed realistic freezing rate of droplets within the vertical cloud structure. The represented detailed sectional ice microphysics with prognostic aerosols is crucially important in reproducing mixed-phase clouds.

Jaakko Ahola et al.

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Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion

Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Jaakko Ahola et al.

Jaakko Ahola et al.

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Latest update: 07 Aug 2020
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Short summary
In this study, we present an improved cloud model that reproduces the behaviour of mixed-phase clouds containing liquid droplets and ice crystals in more detail than before. This model is a convenient computational tool that enables studying phenomena that cannot be fitted into a laboratory. These clouds have a significant role in climate but they are not yet properly understood. Here, we show the advantages of the new model in a case study focusing on Arctic mixed-phase clouds.
In this study, we present an improved cloud model that reproduces the behaviour of mixed-phase...
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