Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-70
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-70

  24 May 2018

24 May 2018

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal ACP. A revision for further review has not been submitted.

OCEANFILMS sea-spray organic aerosol emissions – Part 1: implementation and impacts on clouds

Susannah M. Burrows1, Richard Easter1, Xiaohong Liu2, Po-Lun Ma1, Hailong Wang1, Scott M. Elliott3, Balwinder Singh1, Kai Zhang1, and Philip J. Rasch1 Susannah M. Burrows et al.
  • 1Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  • 2University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA
  • 3Los Alamos National Laboratory

Abstract. The OCEANFILMS parameterization for sea-spray organic aerosol emissions has been implemented into a global Earth system model, the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM). OCEANFILMS is a physically-based model that links sea spray chemistry with ocean biogeochemistry using a Langmuir partitioning approach. Here we describe the implementation within E3SM and investigate the impacts of the parameterization on the model's aerosols, clouds and climate. Four sensitivity cases are tested, in which organic emissions either strictly add to or strictly replace sea salt emissions (in mass and number), and are either fully internally or fully externally mixed with sea salt. The simulation with internally-mixed, added organics agrees best with observed seasonal cycles of organic matter in marine aerosol. In this configuration, marine organic aerosols contribute an additional source of cloud condensation nuclei, adding up to 30 cm−3 to Southern Ocean boundary-layer CCN concentrations (supersaturation = 0.1 %). The addition of this new aerosol source strengthens shortwave radiative cooling by clouds by −0.36 W/m2 in the global annual mean, and contributes more than −3.5 W/m2 to summertime zonal mean cloud forcing in the Southern Ocean, with maximum zonal mean impacts of about −4 W/m2 around 50° S–60° S. This is consistent with a previous top-down, satellite-based empirical estimate of the radiative forcing by marine organic aerosol over the Southern Ocean.

Susannah M. Burrows et al.

 
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Susannah M. Burrows et al.

Susannah M. Burrows et al.

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Latest update: 23 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Sea spray particles are composed of a mixture of salts and organic substances from oceanic microorganisms. In prior work, our team developed an approach connecting sea spray chemistry to ocean biology, called OCEANFILMS. Here we describe its implementation within an Earth System Model, E3SM. We show that simulated sea spray chemistry is consistent with observed seasonal cycles, and that sunlight reflected by simulated Southern Ocean clouds increases, consistent with analysis of satellite data.
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